Weekend

Happy Weekend everyone! We are so excited there is a fall chill in the air! We have lots to prepare for the week so we are eager to keep the momentum going! Speaking at the high school this past week was so encouraging.  Seeing the younger generations eager to learn more about UAV’s and aviation was exciting!  We had the chance to speak to over 100 students this past week and we can’t wait to do it all again soon.

 

 

Teaching Classes

Happy Wednesday! Hope where ever you are today has been a good one!  It is 80 degrees and sunny here in New England and we are almost halfway through October which is crazy!  Tomorrow we will be teaching 3 classes at a local High School.  We will be talking about what it’s like to own a UAV business, the uses for UAV’s, demonstrating and also encouraging career paths in aviation.

These young minds have a lot on their plate and we are excited to give them a break from their usual classes to spend their time with us and have some fun.  I have a background in education so this is a breeze for me!  We love educating anyone on the use of UAV’s.

In 2 weeks we will be speaking at another school two days in a row.  We are teaming up with RC Propbusters  pilot, David Grainger and he will be showing the youth some fun tricks with his racing drones.

So stay tuned for pictures & videos from the school programs! Have a great rest of the week!

10 Easy Ways to Save $ & Energy in Your Home

Happy Wednesday!

Did you know that Bryan is a licensed home inspector?  Home inspections can be done at any time, not just for when you are considering buying a home.  If you are a current home owner, you might want to consider getting a home inspection so you can stay on top of things in your home.  Pre inspections are also a good idea if you’re considering selling your home.

As the leaves are changing here in New England, and as the days start to get cooler here are a few tips & tricks to save money and energy in your home.

 

*Tips & tricks courtesy of Internachi*

 

Weekly blog

Happy Friday friends!

We hope you have some fun plans this weekend!  We will be tightening and finishing up some projects we have going on.  We have been doing some sweet 3D models and we are so excited to share them with you!  3D modeling is such a unique fun tool for businesses to use.  Besides being esthetically pleasing and marketable on a digital platform, they are also very useful for other industries to make measurements from and utilize to make work flows easier.  This is an example of what we will be talking about on our podcast!  We have 1 episode done and we will be filming another 1 or 2 before we start to upload them.  We have been so excited to share some of this with you all!

I will also start to post more regularly and I’ve chosen Wednesdays to be those lucky days.  Anyone else have a million reminders on their phone? I can’t be the only one! We use those little boxes for everything these days, they are so versatile!  I’ve set my reminder every Wednesday and will be creating fun content every week from our travels, our projects, as well as useful info like our Mold blog!  If there is any topic in particular you would like to read send me an email or reach out via social networks and I would be more than happy to write about it!

Have a great weekend and I’ll see you all on Wednesdays!

 

 

 

Podcast

Say whaaaaaaa??! Yup! AerialScope started a podcast! We recently recorded our first episode!  Our plan is to record a few at a time and upload them all together.  The biggest question has been do we do just audio or do we incorporate video as well.  We have a unique set up because our podcast partner, Scott of Quad Axis lives in Texas.   Scott brings lots of experience and knowledge to our podcast and we are excited to partner with him for this fun venture!  We met Scott while doing a 3D model out west last year and it’s been fun to have another brain to bounce ideas off of.  This is the birth of a new industry here so there are questions, mixed emotions etc around drones.  We want to help educate everyone and put their mind at ease that these can be very efficient tools, if used properly.

Our podcast will be geared towards helping customers understand how drone applications can help their businesses (but, if you are a fellow UAVer you are more than welcome to listen!).  We will be having different industry professionals and guests on the show.  If you are curious about how drones can impact your industry, please reach out!  We would love to hear your story.  If you want to be on the show also let us know!

Stay tuned for more DronesOnSightPodcast news!  Here’s our logo:

Check out AerialScope’s podcast partner, Scott: *www.quadaxisllc.com*

 

Google Gravity Games 2018

We just got home from North Carolina where we had the pleasure of filming the 2018 Google Gravity Games!  You’re probably asking yourself, ‘What are the Gravity Games’?  Well, it’s an educational competition to get younger generations excited about Science, sponsored by Google.

The Gravity Games are especially relevant because kids these days need more Science, Art and Music in their lives.  Funding for lots of these programs has unfortunately been cut so this kind of event is awesome at sparking creativity and helping those students achieve more than they could ever dream!  With a variety of hands on activities, science tents, music etc this event is an all day town takeover in North Carolina and we feel so blessed to be part of it again!

Below is last year’s 2017 Gravity Games video so take a peek and get excited for the 2018 video! Also, know someone who would like to enter? Check out their official NC Gravity Games website below and good luck!

NC Gravity Games

2017 Gravity Games :

Nor’Easter

Happy Friday!

Spring is here and the four Nor’Easters we had this month will go down in the books!

It’s a holiday weekend so be safe and enjoy time with friends and family!

Happy Easter from ASVI

 

Mold Blog Part 3

MOLD Series PART 3: The Final Chapter

This is the last of our MOLD series and we hope you’ve learned a thing or two!

Testing or Sampling for Mold

Is sampling for mold needed?  In most cases if visible mold growth is present, sampling is unnecessary.  Since no EPA or other federal limits have been set for mold or mold spores, sampling cannot be used to check a building’s compliance with federal mold standards.  Surface sampling may be useful to determine if an area has been adequately cleaned or remediated.  Sampling for mold should be conducted by professionals who have specific experience in designing  mold sampling protocols, sampling methods, and interpreting results.  Sample analysis should follow analytical methods recommended by the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA), the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), or other professional organizations.

Suspicion of Hidden Mold 

You may suspect hidden mold if a building smells moldy but you cannot see the source, or if you know there has been water damage and residents are reporting health problems. Mold may be hidden in places such as the backside of dry wall, wallpaper or paneling, the top-side of ceiling tiles, or the underside of carpets and pads, etc. Other possible locations of hidden mold include areas inside walls around pipes (with leaking or condensing pipes), the surface of walls behind furniture (where condensation forms), inside ductwork, and in roof materials above ceiling tiles (due to roof leaks or insufficient insulation).

Investigating Hidden Mold Problems 

Investigating hidden mold problems may be difficult and will require caution when the investigation involves disturbing potential sites of mold growth. For example, removal of wallpaper can lead to a massive release of spores if there is mold growing on the underside of the paper. If you believe that you may have a hidden mold problem, consider hiring an experienced professional.

Cleanup and Biocides 
 
Biocides are substances that can destroy living organisms. The use of a chemical or biocide that kills organisms such as mold (chlorine bleach, for example) is not recommended as a routine practice during mold cleanup. There may be instances, however, when professional judgment may indicate its use (for example, when immune-compromised individuals are present). In most cases, it is not possible or desirable to sterilize an area; a background level of mold spores will remain, and these spores will not grow if the moisture problem has been resolved. If you choose to use disinfectants or biocides, always ventilate the area and exhaust the air to the outdoors. Never mix chlorine bleach with other cleaning solutions or detergents that contain ammonia because toxic fumes could be produced.

*Please note: Dead mold may still cause allergic reactions in some people, so it is not enough to simply kill the mold; it must also be removed.*
 
Ten Things You Should Know About Mold

1.  Potential health effects and symptoms associated with mold exposure include allergic reactions, asthma, and other respiratory complaints.

2.  There is no practical way to eliminate all mold and mold spores in the indoor environment; the way to control indoor mold growth is to control moisture.

3.  If mold is a problem in your home, you must clean up the mold and eliminate sources of moisture.

4.  Fix the source of the water problem or leak to prevent mold growth.

5.  Reduce indoor humidity (to 30% to 60%) to decrease mold growth by:
a. venting bathrooms, dryers, and other moisture-generating sources to the outside;
b. using air conditioners and de-humidifiers;
c. increasing ventilation; and
d. using exhaust fans whenever cooking, dishwashing, and cleaning.
6.  Clean and dry any damp or wet building materials and furnishings within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth.

7.  Clean mold off hard surfaces with water and detergent, and dry completely. Absorbent materials that are moldy (such as carpeting and ceiling tiles) may need to be replaced.

8.  Prevent condensation.  Reduce the potential for condensation on cold surfaces (i.e., windows, piping, exterior walls, roof and floors) by adding insulation.

9.  In areas where there is a perpetual moisture problem, do not install carpeting.

10.  Molds can be found almost anywhere; they can grow on virtually any substance, provided moisture is present. There are molds that can grow on wood, paper, carpet, and foods.
Congrats! You’ve successfully completed reading all three parts to our MOLD! series.  We hope this information helped you!  Have a great weekend!

*MOLD blog courtesy of www.Internachi.com*

Mold Blog Part 2

MOLD! Part Deux

Contain your excitement! This is the second part of our MOLD series so get a comfy seat, a cup of coffee and take some notes.

How do I get rid of mold?

It is impossible to get rid of all mold and mold spores indoors.  Some mold spores will be found floating through the air and in house dust. Mold spores will not grow if moisture is not present.  Indoor mold growth can and should be prevented or controlled by controlling moisture indoors. If there is mold growth in your home, you must clean up the mold and fix the water problem. If you clean up the mold but don’t fix the water problem, then, most likely, the mold problem will recur.

Who should do the cleanup?

This depends on a number of factors.  One consideration is the size of the mold problem.  If the moldy area is less than about 10 square feet (less than roughly a 3-foot by 3-foot patch), in most cases, you can handle the job yourself, following the guidelines below.
• If there has been a lot of water damage, and/or mold growth covers more than 10 square feet, consult with an InterNACHI inspector.
• If you choose to hire a contractor (or other professional service provider) to do the cleanup, make sure the contractor has experience cleaning up mold.  Check references and ask the contractor to follow the recommendations of the EPA, the guidelines of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygenists (ACGIH), or other guidelines from professional or government organizations.
• Do not run the HVAC system if you know or suspect that it is contaminated with mold.  This could spread mold throughout the building.
• If the water and/or mold damage was caused by sewage or other contaminated water, then call in a professional who has experience cleaning and fixing buildings damaged by contaminated water.
• If you have health concerns, consult a health professional before starting cleanup.

Tips and Techniques 

The tips and techniques presented in this section will help you clean up your mold problem.  Professional cleaners or remediators may use methods not covered here.  Please note that mold may cause staining and cosmetic damage.  It may not be possible to clean an item so that its original appearance is restored.
• Fix plumbing leaks and other water problems as soon as possible. Dry all items completely.
• Scrub mold off hard surfaces with detergent and water, and dry completely.
• Absorbent or porous materials, such as ceiling tiles and carpet, may have to be thrown away if they become moldy. Mold can grow on or fill in the empty spaces and crevices of porous materials, so the mold may be difficult or impossible to remove completely.
• Avoid exposing yourself or others to mold.
• Do not paint or caulk moldy surfaces.
• Clean up the mold and dry the surfaces before painting. Paint applied over moldy surfaces is likely to peel.  If you are unsure about how to clean an item, or if the item is expensive or of sentimental value, you may wish to consult a specialist. Specialists in furniture repair and restoration, painting and art restoration and conservation, carpet and rug cleaning, water damage, and fire or water restoration are commonly listed in phone books. Be sure to ask for and check references. Look for specialists who are affiliated with professional organizations.

What to Wear When Cleaning Moldy Areas:  

• Avoid breathing in mold or mold spores.  In order to limit your exposure to airborne mold, you may want to wear an N-95 respirator, available at many hardware stores and online (they cost about $12 to $25).  Some N-95 respirators resemble a paper dust mask with a nozzle on the front, and others are made primarily of plastic or rubber and have removable cartridges that trap and prevent most of the mold spores from entering.  In order to be effective, the respirator or mask must fit properly, so carefully follow the instructions supplied with the respirator. Please note that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires that respirators fit properly (via fit testing) when used in an occupational setting.
• Wear gloves. Long gloves that extend to the middle of the forearm are recommended.  When working with water and a mild detergent, ordinary household rubber gloves may be used.  If you are using a disinfectant, a biocide such as chlorine bleach, or a strong cleaning solution, you should select gloves made from natural rubber, neoprene, nitrile, polyurethane or PVC.  Avoid touching mold or moldy items with your bare hands.
• Wear goggles.  Goggles that do not have ventilation holes are recommended.  Avoid getting mold or mold spores in your eyes.

How do I know when the remediation or cleanup is finished?
You must have completely fixed the water or moisture problem before the cleanup or remediation can be considered finished, based on the following guidelines:
• You should have completed the mold removal.  Visible mold and moldy odors should not be present.  Please note that mold may cause staining and cosmetic damage.
• You should have revisited the site(s) shortly after cleanup, and it should show no signs of water damage or mold growth.
• People should have been able to occupy or re-occupy the area without health complaints or physical symptoms.
• Ultimately, this is a judgment call; there is no easy answer. If you have concerns or questions, be sure to ask your InterNACHI inspector during your next scheduled inspection.

 Moisture and Mold Prevention and Control Tips

• Moisture control is the key to mold control, so when water leaks or spills occur indoors, ACT QUICKLY.  If wet or damp materials or areas are dried within 24 to 48 hours after a leak or spill happens, in most cases, mold will not grow.
• Clean and repair roof gutters regularly.
• Make sure the ground slopes away from the building’s foundation so that water does not enter or collect around the foundation.
• Keep air-conditioning drip pans clean and the drain lines unobstructed and flowing properly.
• Keep indoor humidity low.  If possible, keep indoor humidity below 60% relative humidity (ideally, between 30% to 50%).  Relative humidity can be measured with a moisture or humidity meter, which is a small, inexpensive instrument (from $10 to $50) that is available at many hardware stores.
• If you see condensation or moisture collecting on windows, walls or pipes, ACT QUICKLY to dry the wet surface and reduce the moisture/water source.  Condensation can be a sign of high humidity.
Actions that will help to reduce humidity:
• Vent appliances that produce moisture, such as clothes dryers, stoves, and kerosene heaters, to the outdoors, where possible.  (Combustion appliances, such as stoves and kerosene heaters, produce water vapor and will increase the humidity unless vented to the outside.)
• Use air conditioners and/or de-humidifiers when needed.
• Run the bathroom fan or open the window when showering.  Use exhaust fans or open windows whenever cooking, running the dishwasher or dishwashing, etc.
Actions that will help prevent condensation:
• Reduce the humidity (see above).
• Increase ventilation and air movement by opening doors and/or windows, when practical.  Use fans as needed.
• Cover cold surfaces, such as cold water pipes, with insulation.
• Increase air temperature.

 

You did it!  Lots of great pertinent info in here.  Part 3, the final chapter is coming soon!

 

*MOLD blog courtesy of www.internachi.com*